Join Daniel Barth-Jones  for a discussion on the risks of privacy issues relating to the re-identification of data and more.

Join Dr. Andrea Wiggins for a discussion on the role of technologies in citizen science, and how ordinary people become involved in meaningful real-world research through citizen science projects, and how technologies can help.

Crisis Text Line is a not-for-profit organization that provides free crisis intervention counseling and psychological services via text messaging. Join Chief Data Scientist Bob Filbin, Nitya Kanuri, and Matt Bietz for a discussion on their groundbreaking work.

The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT) seeks to develop detailed guidance for entities that collect health and wellness data on how to conduct internal research in a manner that honors the privacy and dignity of their user population. Working in partnership with one such entity, Fitbit, we will produce guidelines on privacy-protective internal research for companies using consumer-generated health data, and provide recommendations on providing customer and public benefit through research activities.

How does the environment around us support or inhibit our healthy behaviors? In this pilot study, we will demonstrate and learn from the use of new personal sensor data in aggregate to, inform our understanding of how the relation between the built environment and types and amounts of exercise varies over time.

Inter-individual differences such as age, gender, genetic variations, and personality can substantially impact the optimal time of day for performing cognitively demanding tasks i.e., the circadian rhythm of cognitive performance. Such differences can also affect individuals’ abilities to physiologically and cognitively cope with sleep deprivation and irregular sleep, which have negative impacts on cognitive performance as well.

The potential benefits of personal and mobile health technologies (also known as mHealth or eHealth) are becoming clearer. These technologies help reconfigure our relationship with our health, giving us access to new forms of data and new paths Mobile technologies have the capacity to track factors that are important to health like being physically active and provide customized interventions exactly when and where it would be most beneficial for each person. While this possibility exists in theory, in practice it is very hard to know when the right time is for delivering these sorts of messages. Emerging technologies such as the smartwatch (e.g., Apple Watch) and indoor location sensors that can track where a person is inside buildings provide better opportunities to identity those exact moments when a person might both benefit from and be receptive to messages to help them achieve their personal goals. for reflection and self-improvement. These technologies can also become instruments for the delivery of health care, both through general lifestyle improvements and their use for clinical monitoring and interventions.

The potential benefits of personal and mobile health technologies (also known as mHealth or eHealth) are becoming clearer. These technologies help reconfigure our relationship with our health, giving us access to new forms of data and new paths for reflection and self-improvement. These technologies can also become instruments for the delivery of health care, both through general lifestyle improvements and their use for clinical monitoring and interventions.

This webinar will showcase Emil Chiauzzi’s and Eric Hekler’s agile research project which focuses on behavior change in patients with MS through self-monitoring and self-experimentation.

Join CDT and other experts in a high-level conversation on the intersection between personal health data, emerging technologies like wearables, and employee wellness programs. The panel will explore the privacy implications of employee wellness programs as well as recent policy developments that may end up neutralizing key health privacy laws like the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Non-disclosure Act.

Today, collecting and storing personal health-related data is relatively easy with sensors like Fitbit and smartphone apps like Apple’s Healthkit. However, doing something useful with that data — enhancing doctor-patient decision making or advancing medical research discoveries — is far more difficult. O’Reilly Media recently completed a project with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Health eHeart project at the University of California San Francisco Medical School designed to uncover ways to accelerate the pace and efficacy of online, crowd-sourced clinical studies. View webinar here.

We have rapidly entered an era where researchers collect data ‘on-the-fly,’ in real-time and, subsequently, are able to design potentially meaningful, personalized and adaptive health interventions. These technologies include devices/apps that enable data collection via Mobile Imaging, pervasive Sensing, Social-media and Tracking (MISST) methods. While opportunities are fantastic, standards to guide ethical conduct of this research are lagging behind creating challenges for IRBs and researchers alike. View webinar here.

Classical clinical trials harvest a handful of measurements from thousands of people.  Precision medicine requires different ways of testing interventions.  Researchers need to probe the myriad factors — genetic and environmental, among others — that promote an individual’s health, their susceptibility to disease, and their response to a particular treatment. View webinar here.